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TN History for Kids

Teacher's guide to Kindergarten lessons with Boxy

This page contains background information and photo descriptions for the booklet Kindergarten lessons with Boxy.

I, Bill Carey, wrote the content after studying the standards. Three teachers (Murray Benson of Metro Nashville, Cindy Tumblin of Franklin Special Schools and Pam Henderson of Robertson County) worked a consultants on the project and made great recommendations and suggestions along the way.

If you have any comments about the booklet or suggestions for this teacher's guide, email me at bill@tnhistoryforkids.org.

Chapters One through Five

The content in chapters one through five is usually covered early in the school year, which is why we decided to put it at the beginning of the booklet. Here are some interesting points as you work your way through this section:

  • The police officers pictured on page 7 are standing in Market Square in downtown Knoxville.
  • The green volumes pictured on page 9 are, in fact, the laws of the state of Tennessee (known as Tennessee Code Annotated).
  • "Happy Boxy" on page 13 is intended to be a page where kids can use crayons or markers to color Boxy.
  • The Cherokee Powwow pictured on page 17 is the Indian Creek Productions Powwow which occurs every August.
  • The Museum of Appalachia (photo on page 19) is in Anderson County and is very much worth a visit.
  • The Clay County community of Free Hill is an interesting story.

Chapters Six through Ten

Time is the recurring theme of these chapters:

  • The photo on page 37 was taken on the steep hike from the Monteagle Assembly Grounds down the Cumberland Plateau.
  • The fall photo on page 39 was taken when I pulled my car over the side of Interstate 40.
  • The page 42 photo was taken at the Tennessee History Day competition in downtown Nashville in April 2014.
  • The old photo on page 43 was taken in Cannon County in 1930. Click here for an article about this photo.
  • The photo of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. shown on page 45 was taken only a few days before he was assassinated.
  • I wish I knew more about the Tennessee National Guard photo on page 48, but I do not.
  • Tell the kids to go to town coloring Banjo Boxy on page 49!

Chapters 11 through 13

... are about money:

  • The candy store on page 51 can be found in the downtown Nashville Arcade
  • Chapter 13 was not easy to write or illustrate. It also is not easy to understand what the standards mean when they talk about cash, check and credit card. The degree to which we explained it here seemed most appropriate for kindergarten students.

Chapter 14

  • The bald eagle photo on page 63 was taken in suburban Williamson County, not far from CoolSprings Galleria. So bald eagles are not as rare as they used to be!

Chapters 15 and 16

This is a good time to thank Black Fox Elementary in Murfreesboro and Percy Priest Elementary in Nashville for allowing us to take photos that help illustrate this booklet. Also:

  • In the first grade booklet called Critters, Maps and Heroes, students make a map similar to the one on page 71.
  • The Marshall County map on page 72 is on the wall of the municipal building in Lewisburg, and was painted by high school students.
  • Earth ball sized inflatable globes such as the one on page 76 can be purchased for around $40. I highly recommend getting one.

Chapter 17

  • The photo on page 79 was taken in 1935 in Cleveland (Bradley County).
  • The photo at the top of page 80 was taken in West Tennessee in the 1890s. I don't know where.
  • The photo on the bottom left of page 80 was taken in 1916 in Pulaski (Giles County).
  • The page 81 photo was taken at the McReynolds School in South Pittsburg (Marion County), I believe in the 1930s.
  • The photo on page 82 was taken in 1930 in Lebanon (Wilson County).
  • The children standing on page 83 were photographed at Ellis Island, New York, in 1908. These children were immigrating to the United States.

Chapter 18

  • You can find more information about the people mentioned here elsewhere on the Tennessee History for Kids website under "PEOPLE."